TypeKey: The Patriot Act of Weblogging

Six Apart has posted a page describing their TypeKey installation, and it is a centralized authentication system. Only one word can describe this design idea: bad.

With a centralized authentication system for comments, a person can be tracked by their comments wherever they go, even if they dont want to be so tracked. Six Apart says they would never share this information with anyone. I dont care the potential for abuse is there.

Now, just imagine someone cracking into the TypeKey system what kind of information about you can be found? What kind of havoc can occur when comments are managed in such a centralized way? Especially when this system transcends weblogging tools?

From a performance standpoint, how many times do you get a failure when you ping weblogs.com or blo.gs or even movabletype.org? Blogspot or TypePad users, have any problems accessing your service? Have you all tried to ping two Trackback-enabled TypePad weblog posts with the same entry, and found it has failed? How about you folks that link to Amazon or Google or Sitemeter or blogrolling.com on your pages ever notice how slow your page loads?

All of these are dependent on centralized systems, and as we have found in every single instance of centralization and weblogs, they dont scale. Every single instance.

Now imagine trying to comment at someones page, and you cant because TypeKey is currently overloaded. What is the reason for having your own weblog installation if you clutter it up with all these centralized bits?

And who asked for authentication? We asked for better management of comment spam, and a better method to delete comment spam. We were willing to tolerate a comment registration system for this, but no one asked for a centralized authentication system.

No one.

Authentication is not a solution for comment spam its a way of cutting out those individuals who might be more comfortable commenting anonymously, or without attaching a URL or email address. And sometimes it is these people who provide the most honest feedback, even though the feedback may be negative, disagreeing with what we say.

The page at TypeKey says that the identity can be protected, but what happens if someone complains about a person and their comments is Ben and Mena going to set up behavior standards for every one to follow with what they write? This is a private service: they can set up any standard they want, and once youre tied into the service, youre stuck. What if they define you as an abuser?

Yo! All you Howard Stern fans! Ding, ding, ding! Ring any bells?

If were so afraid of openness, why have comments? Why not just turn comments off? Better yet, put your weblog behind a firewall and only give the key to entry to those friends who have sworn a blood oath with you.

And less we think only Movable Type weblogs or TypePad weblogs will be tied into this vendor controlled solution, think again: Six Apart will be kind enough to provide this for everyone to use with their weblogs, regardless of software. Though the service is free, it does tie the weblogging community tightly into dependency on Six Apart, and this is not a good thing. Want me to enumerate other problems that have occurred because of dependency on a single entity?

Well, I have a hint for you: I will never register with a centralized authentication system. So if you want comments from me, forget it. Know something else? Theres going to be a whole lot of people right there with me.

Ive been told that, supposedly, civilized people only use positive means to criticize each other. And after all, TypeKey is from Ben and Mena we all know Ben and Mena. Theyre part of us.

Well, sorry, this doesnt wash anymore. Six Apart is no longer the baby squirrels; its a growing VC-funded company that just opened offices in Japan. And there is no positive way to say this TypeKey is a bad idea.

And when I published this, Movable Type gave me the following error:

Ping http://rpc.weblogs.com/RPC2 failed: Ping error: Cant accept the ping because the weblog hasnt changed.

Update

A second essay on TypeKey can be read here based on newer information. My response to the release of the TypeKey FAQ can be read here.

Shelley

About this entry:

Author: Shelley Powers
Published: March 20, 2004 at 8:09 am
Categories: Technology
Comment Status: closed with 55 Comments

Comments
[ 1 ]   9:24 am 3/20/2004

TypeKey Centralized!
Well, Six Apart has released more information on TypeKey, and its everything I fear: a centralized login service for blogs creates a lower barrier to comment registration and helps prevent comment spamming. It also has all my privacy and DDOS conc

Disobey Nonsense Network

[ 2 ]   9:55 am 3/20/2004

More on Bad Ideas
Shelley has more to say in TypeKey: The Patriot Act of Weblogging. For my own thoughtsTypePad didnt/doesnt impress me. A good example of a reasonable technology with a fairly sound business plan spinning into potential grief. Funding from renowned

Digital Common Sense

[ 3 ]   10:50 am 3/20/2004

Shelley: I dunno Im reserving judgement until Ive seen running code.

For example, what if TypeKey is designed in such a way that you can run your own version of it locally? All the hosted tools already have authentication systems what if we can each clone TK and thus spread the load? I dunno about anyone else, but Id be happy to help any JournURL user improve her overall online experience, even if that means authenticating her on other vendors apps.

All of these are dependent on centralized systems, and as we have found in every single instance of centralization and weblogs, they dont scale. Every single instance.

Like it or not, the percentage of self-hosted blogs and services is going to steadily shrink over time. Most folks will suffer occasional downtime rather than learn server administration from the ground up.

And who asked for authentication?

A *lot* of people. I know folks who will simply ignore all anonymous posts on principle if youre not willing to back it up with an identity, they dont want to hear it. And then there are those who simply wont participate in an arena that allows unidentified posting.

(FWIW, I think its important to establish a distinction between anonymity and identity. If you create a forum account with the name Judy and participate there for a year, you will have an identity, but youll still be anonymous. Unless your name is really Judy. :-) )

Authentication is not a solution for comment spam

Its *a* solution, one that has worked just fine for a couple decades on message boards everywhere. The authentication mothership concept isnt even new, since Compuserve and Co. had centralized ID systems that worked across hundreds of communities.

The page at TypeKey says that the identity can be protected, but what happens if someone complains about a person and their comments is Ben and Mena going to set up behavior standards for every one to follow with what they write?

I suppose they could, but that would seem an odd choice. The way it *should* work, IMO, is that TK verifies the identity of a user, and then the blog owner gets to match it against his local blacklist.

If were so afraid of openness, why have comments?

That cuts both ways. If someone is so afraid of openness, why bother commenting? Send an email.

Ive been told that, supposedly, civilized people only use positive means to criticize each other.

Bah. A virtual 2x4 upside the head is often the only way to get through to someone. But its a whole lot easier to respect that blow to the noggin when you know who was wielding the club.

Roger Benningfield

[ 4 ]   11:04 am 3/20/2004

Roger, this is definitely a service. Everything I read tells me that this is centrally located. As for other discussion points, it is true, a lot of people do like having hosted weblogging solutionsbut a lot of people dont. And they are Movable Type people. Now, there is this centralized bit being added into the sites.

This is different from the old discussion board systems where you have a centralized ID. In those cases, it was like one big discussion area, separated by interest, and using one registration system.

Different from distributed weblogs that end up tied together, will they or wont they, by a centralized authentication scheme.

I imagine there is a way in MT 3.0 to not use this service there has to be, Six Apart cant expect everyone to buy into this but if you want to comment at weblogs that do, you have to register. Not individually for the weblog globally for the service. And every time you comment, from what I can read, it gets authenticated against this system, or it gets carried around with you as you go from blog to blog. Either way, I cant buy into this.

Shelley

[ 5 ]   12:47 pm 3/20/2004

After reading their page I still can not figure out if a weblog owner initiates this service whether all commenters on that weblog then have to register or whether the blog owner has an abillityto allow both types of commenters. The former is bad , bad , bad the latter is acceptable I suppose, though Im with you on the downsides of centralization Shelley.

At least the comments themselves are not being stored on typepads server, just the authentication.

and comment information is only retained on the site youve commented on, not on the TypeKey service

If the reverse were true that would be pure manna for Ashcroft and his ilk.

The Dynamic Driveler

[ 6 ]   1:02 pm 3/20/2004

TypeKey: Big Picture
This morning, I read over at Jeff Jarvis blog that Six Apart, the makers of Movable Type and TypePad had announced TypeKey, which would be a sort of authorization center for weblog comments. Bloggers could add the TypeKey software into

the media drop

[ 7 ]   1:17 pm 3/20/2004

I can see problems right away. I had one abuser who flooded my comments because he disagreed with my politics. I have the right to ban him from my blog, but with that one ban, it appears I would have to put him in the central database which would ban him from all MT blogs. Do I have the right to ban him from ALL blogs, including the ones he and his neonazi buddies run? There are far more of his skinhead buddies running blogs than me, could they get together and outvote my ban decision, leaving ME unprotected?

Charles

[ 8 ]   6:05 pm 3/20/2004

TypeKey? No, I dont think so
MovableType 3.0 is coming, and included with that will be TypeKey. Its a centralized comment registration system. Maybe it was just me, but when I heard comment registration was coming in MovableType 3.0, I thought it would be a MySQL-type

A View From Home

[ 9 ]   8:53 pm 3/20/2004

Hehe, it is harsh, but right on point. Since you mentioned the bad things, I would mention the good things, and then add some more to badd stuff.

It is a good thing, because now you may control who can comment and who can not. You can have nice web sites, content management solutions where managing logins is easier, cause typekey will handle it for you. Furthermore if you are sick of irresponsible people commenting on your blogs, you can use this system. People will be less likely to make you angry. As a developer myself and as a site owner, I like the idea. I think there should be such a solution, however there are problems.

First of all, Anonymous access is important. No matter how hard you try to identify everybody, people will want to remain anonymous. It is part of the internet, just look at slashdot. So many people ranting, saying stupid stuff without any possibility of being identified. Thats a good thing, we need that.

However, typekey will fail in either way simply because Microsofts Passport cost 10000$ upfront cost for a site. This thing can not be done for free, maybe initially, but sooner or later they will charge people. Also you need a solid architecture for this. So, overall I like the idea, but I believe it will fail. It also has to be done by gathering many more companies. SixAparts is a small company for this scale of job.

See this is useful Anonymous comment, so being Anonymous is useful.

Anonymous

[ 10 ]   10:12 pm 3/20/2004

Movable Type 3.0 and TypeKey
So details on Movable Type 3.0 are starting to trickle out. The big item so far is that their solution to comment spam is TypeKey, a free (but not open source), central-server authentication system. Many, many details are left to the imagination her

Teal Sunglasses

[ 11 ]   10:50 pm 3/20/2004

dealing with success
Burningbird: TypeKey: The Patriot Act of Weblogging Following the hype about MovableType 3.0 and SixAparts new TypeKey system, Im not

cloudy, chance of sun breaks

[ 12 ]   12:01 am 3/21/2004

Shelley: Roger, this is definitely a service. Everything I read tells me that this is centrally located.

I was just reviewing what theyve posted, and yeah, youre probably right. But Id still like to think Ben and Mena might have something more up their sleeves that would address some of your concerns.

For example, if TK-compatible services were possible, then self-hosted people like you could run authentication services in much the same way you hosted the Wayward folks. Then I could go into my app, tell it that youre a trusted authority, and your friends would be able to authenticate with me.

In fact, the more I think about it, Six Apart is wasting their time if it *doesnt* work as I hope. Because a few months later, Blogger will do to TypeKey what it did to RSS and throw its weight behind a community-derived alternative. And that will be the end of TK.

Roger Benningfield

[ 13 ]   5:52 am 3/21/2004

More on Typekey
The Blogerati are starting to wade in on TypeKey, Six Aparts new centralized comment registration system, and the initial reactions are the same as mine. Six Apart has posted a page describing their TypeKey installation, and it is a centralized authe

John's Jottings

[ 14 ]   8:53 am 3/21/2004

TypeKey (again)
Im not going to go on much about this until things are clearer its foolish to speculate except to point to the comments (including some by Ms. Trott) on Jeff Jarvis site. Also see: MeFi | Shelley Powers

FultonChain

[ 15 ]   9:23 am 3/21/2004

Definitely alarming, but I think maybe not inherently broken. Some thoughts on how I might set it up:

a) Failure to contact the authentication server = authentication, not rejection. Sure, this means the system is subject to DoS attacks. So what? I dont require perfect authentication for weblog comments.

b) Authentications are transient events which are not stored. This does not eliminate the privacy issues completely, but it certainly minimizes them.

c) Non-authenticated comments still get posted. Maybe I flag em as non-authenticated; that ought to be a user decision, for obvious reasons. More important, HTML in non-authenticated comments gets stripped. This cuts out a big part of the incentive for comment spam PageRank.

I have no doubt that there are flaws with each of these ideas, but they were about five minutes of work. I have to assume that Six Apart isnt so dumb as to miss the problems that occurred to everyone else within seconds. Will they solve em? Well, that remains to be seen Im certainly not convinced that they will. And as Roger says, its a risky path.

Bryant

[ 16 ]   10:56 am 3/21/2004

http://poorbuthappy.com/ease/archives/002626.html
Six Apart is the first company I know of that understands the power of creating open standards. Microsoft creates standards and then tries to keep them proprietary and exert full control. Six Apart seems to understand that you can create

Peter Van Dijck's Guide to Ease

[ 17 ]   11:41 am 3/21/2004

I agree with some of the limitations you describe, but not all.
The central system may not be invoked for every comment (caching of cookies).
Also you may protect the users privacy by not using the ID, but its hash to identify you on comment sites.
Lastly, comment sites may allow you to post pseudo-anonymously (no private info posted on the web page) while storing your hashed ID internally.

Dumky

[ 18 ]   1:57 pm 3/21/2004

I disagree with the use of the term, Patriot Act used in this way.

The Patriot Act works against terrorism and is very successful in doing that by helping catch terrorists or those that would support them. It is a law. A law upheld in much of its form, thus far.

What you are against, and so am I, is a central collection of voluntary information where you lose control of it once it is submitted. If you do not submit the information, they have no way to obtain it. This is a technology issue, not a legal issue.

Throwing Red Herring terms into an argument often weakens the validity of your arguments.

Don

Donald Larson

[ 19 ]   2:42 pm 3/21/2004

MT 3.0 and TypeKey
Filtering of spam and trolls in public and semi-public forums is often quite like censorship. Mistakes will inevitably be made, and there will always be gray areas of what is inappropriate for a given context, so collaborative filtering techniques are

Leif's Weblog

[ 20 ]   3:38 pm 3/21/2004

I have to say that, while Im inclined to agree that centralized services are a Bad Thing, Im also inclined to wait until I can see some running code before I pass judgment on TypeKey. The information we have so far is fragmentary and incomplete. Lets see what this thing actually *is* before we get too concerned over it.

The fact that Jay Allen, who has actually been running MT 3.0 alpha for several weeks now, has been sufficiently impressed by TypeKey to decide that it obviates the need for MT-Blacklist (http://www.jayallen.org/comment_spam/2004/03/movable_type_30_and_mtblacklist ) reinforces this inclination for me. Itll be interesting to hear more of these reports come in as the circle of MT 3.0 users widens.

Jason Lefkowitz

[ 21 ]   4:12 pm 3/21/2004

Donald, you and I differ on the term Patriot Act. To me it is an appropriate and pointed use of the term. I was saying that were reacting, and overreacting, to a specific problem, and willing to close off much of the spontaneity of our discussions in order to have the safety of a heavily controlled environment. Hence, Patriot Act.

As to how this will work, unfortunately, we have to wait for more detailed info. I am puzzled as to the piecemeal release of information.

Jason, I read what Jay Allen wrote. He and I dont agree about how far we should go to protect our comments. I assume our difference in this regard would extent to TypeKey, so his, Relax, youll like it! does not necessarily make me relax.

I would prefer a detailed explanation of the architecture from the designers rather than reports from users, myself.

Shelley

[ 22 ]   4:52 pm 3/21/2004

I like the focus on comment spam, but as others, I have some questions, what happens if the service goes down? Will commenting go down too? Sounds like an attempt to create another version of Microsot Passport. We all know that did pretty well too. *cough*

Anyway, the saddest thing for me is the loss of MT-Blacklist. I think it was a very elegant way to stop comment spam, but this (as well as Google now owning blogger) shows how blogs are big business.

James

[ 23 ]   5:14 pm 3/21/2004

Passport Comes to Frogtown? Quick Jotting on Discussion Censors, etc.
A lot of people are weighing in on SixAparts recent announcement of [TypeKey](http://typekey.sixapart.com/), a service meant to provide a way for people who like to

Pudding Time!

[ 24 ]   8:26 pm 3/21/2004

I think we have seen that registration doesnt provide much of a barrier to spamming. I mean, sheesh, how many spammers have Hotmail and Yahoo email accounts I wish I had a penny for each one despite the measures that both services take to prevent automated account creation and misuse of email accounts. Spammers are just going to find a way around whatever barriers are in place. Block their registered commenting account? Oh well, their bot just created 8 more.

Which makes a centralised comment registry even more silly.

Im with you, Shelley. Anyone using TypeKey will find a distinct lack of my comments on their blog.

ARJ

[ 25 ]   4:34 am 3/22/2004

However, having said that it must also be said that no matter how many bots a spammer may run, they wont be able to *impersonate* someone elses registration.

Thats not a silly thing.

ARJ

[ 26 ]   5:59 am 3/22/2004

Absorbing the Utilities
There is every possibility that MT-Blacklist wont be required once TypeKey is rolled out under Movable Type 3.0. In the

Rodent Regatta

[ 27 ]   8:35 am 3/22/2004

Anything that removes the burden of killing unwanted hate mail from my comments section is a welcome addition in my life. When I first posted an online gallery of Mapplethorpe, I had to cull a dozen homophobic comments each week until I rooted out a Blacklist. Last month, after my students made online observations about St Patricks Day, I had to block a minimum of one anti-Irish comment a day. This kind of anti-social behaviour has to be electronically curbed, without blacking out whole swaths of IP address blocks. Enter Typekey.

And if you still want your anonymity, just start using several e-mail aliases and nics. Thats what most of the geeks and spooks I know do and its worked a charm for the last decade that Ive been burrowing underground.

Bernie Goldbach

[ 28 ]   8:38 am 3/22/2004

Typekey blocks comment spam
TYPEKEY If a slice of the active blogging world implemented the Typekey functions, they would not only kill unwanted commenters but they would be super-aggregated. From what I can see on the Typepad fora, Typekey can facilitate automatic blogroll

IrishEyes

[ 29 ]   9:07 am 3/22/2004

Seems to me that centralized authentication is both overkill, and doesnt really solve the problem. Youre still faced with blacklisting the people who make offensive comments.

Better solutions are already fielded. If youre just concerned with spam, apply a Bayesian filter to your blog comments. For other crap, put your good commenters to workSlashdot-style systems work pretty well.

Anonymous

[ 30 ]   10:51 am 3/22/2004

Perhaps we can work ourselves into a greater frenzy over a new press release?

There are no details released so far, and yet people are drawing battlelines and using the N word (never) about things that have yet to be revealed.

To compare Typepad, an optional authentication system for weblogs, to the Patriot Act, a set of laws every US citizen is bound to without recourse, is the height of FUD.

Why dont you reserve your venom until you actually know what TypeKey does and does not do. Until then, you are simply ranting without facts or knowledge. You are a smart person, you can do better than that.

Lastly, the failure of weblogs.com to work properly has nothing to do with Six Apart or Movalbe Type. Go ask Dave Winer why his site cant handle the volume he asks for and gets.

Michael

[ 31 ]   1:39 pm 3/22/2004

Lastly, the failure of weblogs.com to work properly has nothing to do with Six Apart or Movalbe Type. Go ask Dave Winer why his site cant handle the volume he asks for and gets.

Actually, it has EVERYTHING to do with the subject at hand: centralized internet services. They just dont scale.

Scott Johnson

[ 32 ]   3:41 pm 3/22/2004

Am I pissing on everybodys conspiracy parade if I point out that MT comes in source form?

McGroarty

[ 33 ]   1:30 am 3/23/2004

TypeKey and Movable Type 3.0
Honestly, I dont know what all the hubbub is about. Something has definitely changed in the weblog community. People just

blog.noetech.com

[ 34 ]   4:09 am 3/23/2004

What comes to mind while reading this, is the Google Groups archive hysteria. Many people post articles on Usenet without knowing that they might be searchable for the next thousand years. Many people post articles on Usenet *with* this knowledge. Who does it hurt?

One can search and (ab)use the information found on Google Groups in a zillion different ways, and Google only has one single way to around it; the X-No-Archive: yes header.

Im not sure how we can use the experience we have from Google Groups in this area Im not sure we can at all. I just thought both scenarios were a bit alike, thats all.

Asbj�rn Ulsberg

[ 35 ]   5:44 am 3/23/2004

Typekey: Grand Central Web
From a performance standpoint, how many times do you get a failure when you ping weblogs.com or blo.gs or even movabletype.org? Blogspot or TypePad users, have any problems accessing your service? Have you all tried to ping two Trackback-enabled TypePa

Bill de h�ra

[ 36 ]   5:56 am 3/23/2004

TypeKey Hubbub
Theres been lots of talk about Six Aparts announcement of a centralized identity system for blog comments theyre calling it TypeKey. (Theyve got a preliminary FAQ available now.)

I obviously cant be _too_ opposed to TK, because JournURL (like

Big Damn Heroes (Tech)

[ 37 ]   8:55 am 3/23/2004

Theres a simple solution to all of this, for those that care enough: go to Yahoo, or some other cheap webhost that provides RSS, download PHP-Nuke (http://www.nuke.org) and install it.

Modules for everything, for whatever level of paranoia you desire, including IP banning.

Anon comments, members only comments, no comments.

Oh, and centralized ANYTHING doesnt scale. Just ask the former Soviet Union. Or perhaps the Department of Homeland Security

Bob King

[ 38 ]   10:53 am 3/23/2004

TypeKey: Final Act
Edited Six Apart has released its pre-launch FAQ about TypeKey, and everything I expected about the service has been confirmed. Taking on the issues of registration and centralization, comment spam prevention, centralization and performance, privacy,

Burningbird

[ 39 ]   11:35 am 3/23/2004

Servicios de Autenticación para Blogs
Six Apart, (que recientemente han llegado a un acuerdo con U-Blog para distribuir sus productos en Europa, Próximo Oriente y �?frica), está preparando TypeKey, un servicio de autenticación que permitirá a los visitantes de los blogs comentar en ell

Principia Programmatica

[ 40 ]   12:03 pm 3/23/2004

TypeKey
So SixApart are releasing a new service: TypeKey, a free, open system providing a central identity that anyone can use to log in and post comments on blogs and other web sites. Now there are alot of whiners out there (or should I say, Winers?), sayin

Tao of Dowingba

[ 41 ]   12:20 pm 3/23/2004

Anonymity, Thy Name is
In conjunction with Movable Type 3.0, they are introducing a new service, TypeKey. As is typical in the blogosphere, merely

LibraryPlanet.com

[ 42 ]   3:53 pm 3/23/2004

Contemporaries
I dont like to write short entries. I usually spend about an hour, often more, on a single entry. I dont have any beef with short entries per se, I like reading them, although less so than long ones, but writing them is definately not for me. So when

jogin.com :: weblog

[ 43 ]   5:01 pm 3/23/2004

Yeah, that centralized DNS thing is a total failure It obviously cant scale

Michael

[ 44 ]   7:53 pm 3/23/2004

Beheading
As I hinted at in the previous post (with unprecedented delicacy at that), I dont exactly sympathize with Shelley Powers ritual execution of TypeKey. As also hinted at in the previous post, others have already written it off as utter nonsense, whatev

jogin.com :: weblog

[ 45 ]   9:17 pm 3/23/2004

TypeKey, meet Liberty
As Im sure youve read elsewhere, the Movable Type world is in an uproar about an upcoming feature in version

eliot

[ 46 ]   11:22 pm 3/23/2004

Centralized vs. Decentralized Webloggin in Education
So amidst all the stuff about Typekey is a basic theme which says centralized weblogging systems dont work.

incorporated subversion

[ 47 ]   1:01 am 3/24/2004

TypeKey Announced
Six Apart has announced TypeKey. Due in part to many complaints, they have also put out a FAQ. Burningbird has excellent analyses from both before and after the FAQ release. While its great to see the creators of Movable Type

Full Speed

[ 48 ]   1:04 am 3/24/2004

TypeKey Announced
Six Apart has announced TypeKey. Due in part to many complaints, they have also put out a FAQ. Burningbird has excellent analyses from both before and after the FAQ release. While its great to see the creators of Movable Type

Full Speed

[ 49 ]   4:16 am 3/24/2004

That centralised DNS thing isnt that centralised, despite the fact that every time someone is acting as an apologist for centralised systems its the example they cite (cant you guys find another). It uses multiple centers and a hell of a lot of caching to counter the fact that its centralised - and its still possible for it to have single point failures, remember the attack on the .tp domain by the Ind^H^H^H people completely unconnected with the Indonesian government?

(I normally dont post anonymously, but it seems in the spirit of this article to do so now).

Anonymous

[ 50 ]   3:51 am 3/25/2004

Sistemas de autentificaci�n distribuida
Un peque�o an�lisis de los diferentes sistemas de autentificaci�n distribuida.

amedias

[ 51 ]   1:08 am 4/2/2004

If you dont want people to have potential to track you, dont post. Or dont post on sites with TypeKey. Its a good solution for those people who want to use it. Personally, Ill probably allow for TypeKey authentication and standard commenting, but at least it gives options.

Anonymous

[ 52 ]   11:02 am 4/4/2004

Privacy
I wasnt going to chime in on the topic if Gmail, but an article at The Register prompted some commentary. The article is essentially about the possible intrusions on your privacy that Googles e-mail service will allow. The Register is one of the few

jogin.com :: weblog

[ 53 ]   9:19 pm 4/9/2004

My Thoughts
If youre not interested in my thoughts on Movable Type 3.0 and/or TypeKey then dont bother to continue reading.

This Chick

[ 54 ]   12:26 am 4/11/2004

If you dont want people to have potential to track you, dont post.

I wont. You miss the point completely.

Anonymous

[ 55 ]   4:34 am 5/10/2004

Why dont these comments apply to Blogger as well now? You trust Google more than Six Apart?

Anonymous

Sorry, comments are closed at this time.